City Sidewalks

For Wednesday, July 16, 2014  Prompt #73

 

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Write about an encounter on a city street.

Writing Tips:

  • This can be an encounter between two people, a person and a sign,  an older person and a toddler, three dogs, or some other combination.
  • Balance observation, description, and dialogue.
  • Write for 15 minutes.

Book Suggestion: Alfred Kazin’s A Walker in the City.

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Symbols

prompt for July 5, 2014  Prompt #64

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It’s (still) the 4th of July Weekend here in the U.S. and I’ve been thinking of  patriotic symbols, what they mean to us, and how that differs from person to person.

 

 

Instructions

  1. Choose one of these words or phrases and write it at the top of a fresh page: Bald Eagle. “American” Flag. (Stars and Stripes.) Statue of Liberty. Lady Liberty. Uncle Sam. Or choose your own patriotic symbol.
  2. Write in response to your chosen phrase for 15 minutes.
  3. Need addition direction? Considered exploring “gut” or emotional responses to your phrase or writing about how your response to the symbol has changed over the years.

Follow Up Writing

  • If you are from a country other than the U.S., write about some of your country’s national symbols. Consider, perhaps, how they contrast with those of the U.S.
  • Write about local or community symbols that move you in some way.

Writing Group Variation

  1. Bring in symbols or photos depicting symbols to your writing group — a rainbow flag, a fraternity or sorority pin, a postcard of Smokey Bear, etc. Swap images with other group members. Write in response to them for 15 minutes.

Postponed Until Monday: Further Rant Writing and Variations for Writing Groups

 

Fireworks (Inner and Outer)

prompt for July 4, 2014  Prompt #63

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It’s the 4th of July Weekend. Are you a fireworks YAY person or a firework NAY person? Either way, this post should prompt some sparks.

 

Instructions

  1. Write down 2o words or phrases that you associate with fireworks.
  2. Underline one word or phrase that troubles you or feels different in tone that most of the others words.
  3. Circle one word that particularly appeals to you or is the essence of fireworks.
  4. At the top of a new piece of paper, write down the underlined word as your first word.
  5. At the bottom of the paper, write down the circled word as your last word.
  6. Write 100 to 120 words in between — a poem, story or essay.

 

Follow Up Writing

  • If fireworks were an animal, what would they be?
  • If fireworks were music, what style would they be?
  • If fireworks were an emotion, what would it be?

Use the answers to the above three questions to fashion a poem or one-page story.

Writing Group Variation

  1. Did you see fireworks growing up as a child? Share your experiences with the rest of the group (about 3 minutes each) — Where did you see them? With whom did you watch them? Were you delighted, scared, both, something else?
  2. If you never watched fireworks, write about about another summer tradition that takes place at night.

Postponed Until Monday: Further Rant Writing and Variations for Writing Groups

 

Steal This Prompt!

July 1, 2014  Prompt #60

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It’s another “Down & Dirty” Prompt” day.

Instructions

  1. Write about the first time (or a memorable time) you stole something.
  2. If you have never stolen, write about witnessing someone else stealing or write about your desire to steal  and why you did not follow through.
  3. Start the work with a one-word sentence.
  4. Write for 20 minutes.